Class 25 March, 2015

March 25, 2015 Comments Off on Class 25 March, 2015

Sunny, breezy, and a little humid today.  Full class.

Conclusion: Did not go to plan at all today.  Saved original plan to repost separately.

We went through thoroughly, with each S giving examples and answering questions.

Class 25 March, 2015

Day/Dates

When we say the date we use ordinal numbers, but we do not write them: we say March 25th, we write March 25.
When we say the year we use pairs:  2015 is 20-15 twenty fifteen, 1972 is 19-72 nineteen seventy-two.

What day is it?  This means, “what day of the week is it?”.
Today is Wednesday.

What is the date?  What is the date today?  This is asking about the month, and day in numbers.  That is the date.
Today is March 25(th).  You usually do not need to say the year in conversation.

When were you born?  I was born on November 25(th), 1972.

When is your birthday?   My birthday is on November 25(th).

What month is your birthday?  My birthday is in November.

What month were you born?   I was born in November.

What year were you born?  I was born in 1972.

When do you have class?  I have class on Wednesdays.  I have class every Wednesday.

When do you get up in the mornings?

When do you go to bed?

etc.

Grammar

Some review from Monday class: prepositions of time with in, at, on
We reviewed their homework from Monday – the first section.

We need to do this again next week as written here:

  • in – (time of day, days, weeks) months and years
  • on – a day or date
  • at – specific time, clock times

I was born in 1972.  I was born in November.
I was born on November 23.  I was born on a Tuesday.
I was born in the morning.I was born at 7:30 a.m.
I was born at midnight.

Create exercises for prepositions of time next class.

Tongue Twister

“Whether the weather is warm, whether the weather is hot, we have to put up with the weather, whether we like it or not.”

Notes:

  • Whether and weather pronounced the same – and are not water or wetter.  Whether/weather are not related.
  • Whether is similar to if.   Whether is used with “or not”.  Do not worry about using “whether”.
  • “Put up with” – tolerate.  This is the simple present, meaning in general.
    I put up with traffic when I drive to class.  I put up with stupid people. :)

Etc.

whatever else I may have forgotten.


 

Computer Lab

G and S:

http://learnenglishkids.britishcouncil.org/en/grammar-games/present-simple-and-present-continuous

http://learnenglishkids.britishcouncil.org/en/tricky-words/football-the-moon

We added this, listen, read, word search for plural forms – do more of these: http://learnenglishkids.britishcouncil.org/en/spell/the-birthday-party

Y: The Red Ball exercises. Cloze and sentence order.

 

 

 

 

Class 25 March, 2015 was originally published on Notes for Class

class plan 4dec Wednesday

December 1, 2013 § 1 Comment

Let’s do some basics?

What we actually did in class.

1). Tongue Twister

While we were walking, we were watching window washers wash Washington’s windows with warm washing water

2). Intro speaking basics  they know most of these, but a handout is nice for literacy.

Introductions
My name is……
I come from……
What’s your name?
Where are you from?

Greetings
Hello
hi (informal)
good morning
good afternoon
good evening

Goodbyes
good night
goodbye
bye (informal)
see you (informal)
see you later (informal)

Added ‘have a good one’

Asking for Help
What does this mean?  Required explanation and presented various uses of the word ‘mean’.
I don’t understand.
I don’t understand much English.
Speak more slowly, please.
Could you repeat that, please?

Polite Expressions
fine
sorry
It’s ok.
Thank you.
Thank you very much.
Thanks. (informal)
You’re welcome.
Don’t mention it.
Don’t worry about it.

We spent a little time on the last two. And I presented a couple of uses for ‘mention’.  Including the verb ‘to mention’.  A set of very different, but subtle, differences.

3). Vocabulary  from feeds on my site…

Look out!

PHRASAL VERB

Meaning: If someone is in immediate danger, you can warn them by shouting “Look out!”.

Synonym: Watch out!

For example:

  • Look out! “Look out! There’s a car coming!”
  • Look out! I was riding my bike when this car pulled out in front of me. Just before I hit it, I yelled “Look out!”

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder

SAYING

Meaning: Different people see beauty in different ways. What one person finds beautiful may not appeal to another person.

Note: beholder (noun) = person who beholds | behold (verb) = look at; observe

4).  Grammar

See posts: The, A, An and  Some or Any

Lab list from material presented in class:  more needed

One question comprehensions about the saying and phrasal verb above.

Look out!
http://www.englishclub.com/ref/esl/Phrasal_Verbs/Quizzes/Mixed_6/Look_out__2532.htm

Beauty…beholder
http://www.englishclub.com/ref/esl/Sayings/Quizzes/Mixed_5/Beauty_is_in_the_eye_of_the_beholder_517.htm

after class 11nov

November 11, 2013 § Leave a comment

Class Session:

  • We did the Tonugue Twister
  • Vocab: bittern, bitter, biter
  • And conjugated To Bite, regular verb – simple present, past and future
  • Missed Modals
  • Computer lab completed and finished puzzles – Joanna did the games too (she liked it very much) – I had them post their interpretation of the photograph in comments, if they had an email address.

Maribel and I stayed late to finish a puzzle – food
A very successful class! Yay! Except the headphones were a problem again. I requested speakers. They may buy headphones again too.

Next class:

Preferably printouts:

  • Bring is lists of some Regular and Irregular Verbs
  • Also reflexive pronouns: himself, myself, themselves etc.
  • Modals in general – intro
  • Modal – CAN

Postcard exercise for writing – Glitterbook.  Possibly a letter instead – no card or mail…unless they have someone to send something to in English

  • Write postcard/letter in GB
  • Copy to real postcards
  • Post cards to someone, themselves, me?  Whichever.

class plan Monday 3Nov. Past Contiuous, Confuse(d)

November 4, 2013 § Leave a comment

I am subbing for Esmerelda.   Today present:

1.) Start with a tongue twister:
Mary Mac’s mother’s making Mary Mac marry me.
My mother’s making me marry Mary Mac.
Will I always be so Merry when Mary’s taking care of me?
Will I always be so merry when I marry Mary Mac?

2.). Grammar:

A). Verb: to confuse
I am confused Vs I confuse.

CONFUSE

Pronunciation (US):

Dictionary entry overview: What does confuse mean?

• CONFUSE (verb)
The verb CONFUSE has 6 senses:

1. mistake one thing for another
2. be confusing or perplexing to; cause to be unable to think clearly
3. cause to feel embarrassment
4. assemble without order or sense
5. make unclear or incomprehensible
6. make unclear, indistinct, or blurred

Familiarity information: CONFUSE used as a verb is common.

 Dictionary entry details
• CONFUSE (verb)

Sense 1 confuse [BACK TO TOP]

Meaning:

Mistake one thing for another

Classified under:

Verbs of thinking, judging, analyzing, doubting

Synonyms:

confuse; confound

Context examples:

you are confusing me with the other candidate / I mistook her for the secretary

Hypernyms (to “confuse” is one way to…):

misidentifymistake (identify incorrectly)

Sentence frames:

Somebody —-s something
Somebody —-s somebody
Somebody —-s something PP

Sense 2 confuse [BACK TO TOP]

Meaning:

Be confusing or perplexing to; cause to be unable to think clearly

Classified under:

Verbs of thinking, judging, analyzing, doubting

Synonyms:

befuddleconfoundfoxdiscombobulate; confuse; bedevilfuddlethrow

Context examples:

These questions confuse even the experts / This question completely threw me / This question befuddled even the teacher

Hypernyms (to “confuse” is one way to…):

be (have the quality of being; (copula, used with an adjective or a predicate noun))

Troponyms (each of the following is one way to “confuse”):

demoralize (confuse or put into disorder)

amazebafflebeatbewilderdumbfoundflummoxgetgravelmystifynonplus;perplexposepuzzlestickstupefyvex (be a mystery or bewildering to)

disorientdisorientate (cause to be lost or disoriented)

Sentence frames:

Somebody —-s somebody
Something —-s somebody
Something —-s something

Sense 3 confuse [BACK TO TOP]

Meaning:

Cause to feel embarrassment

Classified under:

Verbs of feeling

Synonyms:

disconcertflurry; confuse; put off

Context example:

The constant attention of the young man confused her

Hypernyms (to “confuse” is one way to…):

abashembarrass (cause to be embarrassed; cause to feel self-conscious)

Troponyms (each of the following is one way to “confuse”):

fluster (cause to be nervous or upset)

bother (make confused or perplexed or puzzled)

deflectdistract (draw someone’s attention away from something)

Sentence frames:

Somebody —-s somebody
Something —-s somebody

Sentence examples:

The bad news will confuse him
The good news will confuse her
The performance is likely to confuse Sue

Sense 4 confuse [BACK TO TOP]

Meaning:

Assemble without order or sense

Classified under:

Verbs of sewing, baking, painting, performing

Synonyms:

mix upjumble; confuse

Context example:

She jumbles the words when she is supposed to write a sentence

Hypernyms (to “confuse” is one way to…):

assemblepieceput togetherset uptacktack together (create by putting components or members together)

Troponyms (each of the following is one way to “confuse”):

addlemuddlepuddle (mix up or confuse)

Sentence frame:

Somebody —-s something

Sense 5 confuse [BACK TO TOP]

Meaning:

Make unclear or incomprehensible

Classified under:

Verbs of thinking, judging, analyzing, doubting

Context example:

The new tax return forms only confuse

Hypernyms (to “confuse” is one way to…):

alterchangemodify (cause to change; make different; cause a transformation)

Sentence frame:

Something —-s

Sense 6 confuse [BACK TO TOP]

Meaning:

Make unclear, indistinct, or blurred

Classified under:

Verbs of thinking, judging, analyzing, doubting

Synonyms:

obscureobnubilateblur; confuse

Context examples:

Her remarks confused the debate / Their words obnubilate their intentions

Hypernyms (to “confuse” is one way to…):

alterchangemodify (cause to change; make different; cause a transformation)

Troponyms (each of the following is one way to “confuse”):

muddy (cause to become muddy)

Sentence frames:

Somebody —-s something
Something —-s something

– from http://www.audioenglish.org/dictionary/confuse.htm

CONFUSED

Pronunciation (US):

Dictionary entry overview: What does confused mean?

• CONFUSED (adjective)
The adjective CONFUSED has 5 senses:

1. perplexed by many conflicting situations or statements; filled with bewilderment
2. lacking orderly continuity
3. having lost your bearings; confused as to time or place or personal identity
4. thrown into a state of disarray or confusion
5. mentally confused; unable to think with clarity or act intelligently

Familiarity information: CONFUSED used as an adjective is common.

 Dictionary entry details
• CONFUSED (adjective)

Sense 1 confused [BACK TO TOP]

Meaning:

Perplexed by many conflicting situations or statements; filled with bewilderment

Synonyms:

mazed; confused; confoundedbewilderedbaffledat seamixed-upbemusedbefuddled;lost

Context examples:

obviously bemused by his questions / bewildered and confused / a cloudy and confounded philosopher / just a mixed-up kid / she felt lost on the first day of school

Similar:

perplexed (full or difficulty or confusion or bewilderment)

Sense 2 confused [BACK TO TOP]

Meaning:

Lacking orderly continuity

Synonyms:

disjointedgarbledscatteredillogicaldisordered; confused; unconnecteddisconnected

Context examples:

a confused set of instructions / a confused dream about the end of the world / disconnected fragments of a story / scattered thoughts

Similar:

incoherent (without logical or meaningful connection)

Sense 3 confused [BACK TO TOP]

Meaning:

Having lost your bearings; confused as to time or place or personal identity

Synonyms:

disorientedlost; confused

Context examples:

I frequently find myself disoriented when I come up out of the subway / the anesthetic left her completely disoriented

Similar:

unoriented (not having position or goal definitely set or ascertained)

Sense 4 confused [BACK TO TOP]

Meaning:

Thrown into a state of disarray or confusion

Synonyms:

disorderedupset; confused; broken

Context examples:

troops fleeing in broken ranks / a confused mass of papers on the desk / the small disordered room / with everything so upset

Similar:

disorganiseddisorganized (lacking order or methodical arrangement or function)

Sense 5 confused [BACK TO TOP]

Meaning:

Mentally confused; unable to think with clarity or act intelligently

Context example:

the flood of questions left her bewildered and confused

Similar:

addlebrainedaddlepatedmuddleheadedpottypuddingheaded (stupid and confused; used especially of persons)

spaced-out (confused or disoriented as if intoxicated through taking a drug)

punch-drunksillyslaphappy (dazed from or as if from repeated blows)

trancelike (as if in a trance)

dazzled (stupefied or dizzied by something overpowering)

dazedstunnedstupefiedstupid (in a state of mental numbness especially as resulting from shock)

clouded (mentally disordered)

befoggedbefuddled (stupefied by alcoholic drink)

addledbefuddledmuddledmuzzywoollywoolly-headedwoolywooly-minded(confused and vague; used especially of thinking)

Also:

perplexed (full or difficulty or confusion or bewilderment)

Antonym:

clearheaded (not mentally confused; able to think clearly and act intelligently)

– from http://www.audioenglish.org/dictionary/confused.htm

B.) Past Continuous – teach | Web Notes
http://surfingnotes.wordpress.com/2013/10/23/past-continuous-teach/

3). Vocabulary: save for Wednesday for writing exercise?
create vocab lists – about.com | Web Notes
http://surfingnotes.wordpress.com/2013/10/15/create-vocab-lists-about-com/

Pick topic
Research vocab
Create list
Mind map

Write?

9oct 2013 Plan

October 9, 2013 § Leave a comment

Things to remember to bring to class:

  • Ear phones
  • Extensions
  • Notebooks

NOTE: from Monday…Vocabulary of the story “The Angel on the Subway”:
poem, complete, famous, station, crowd, fiance, join, perhaps, professional

1.) Start with another tongue twister:

Luke Luck likes lakes.
Luke’s duck likes lakes.
Luke Luck licks lakes.
Luck’s duck licks lakes.
Duck takes licks in lakes Luke Luck likes.
Luke Luck takes licks in lakes duck likes.

from Dr. Seuss’ Fox in Socks

2.) Review homework from Surprise Wedding
Continue with exercises.

3.) Writing: US Citizenship: Are you or would you like to be a US citizen?
Why or why not?

  • If citizen – why did you become a citizen?
  • If not c – why not? Or would you like to be? Or do you plan to become a c?
  • If not interested, why not?

4.) Computer lab: video songs, and quizzes

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